Jungian analytical psychology and the process

Last Updated on Sunday, 27 October After completing his medical studies, Jung obtained a position at the Burghoelzli Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland. There he worked with patients suffering from schizophrenia, while also conducting word association research.

Jungian analytical psychology and the process

Last Updated on Sunday, 27 October After completing his medical studies, Jung obtained a position at the Burghoelzli Hospital in Zurich, Switzerland.

There he worked with patients suffering from schizophrenia, while also conducting word association research. In Jung corresponded with Freud about this latter work and also began to use Freud's psychoanalytic treatment with his patients.

In Freud invited Jung to Vienna, and they began a professional relationship. Freud soon began to favor Jung as his successor in the new and growing psychoanalytic movement. Jung and Freud held in common an understanding of the profound role of the unconscious.

Their understanding of the nature of the unconscious, however, began to diverge. This led to a painful break between the two men in after Jung's publication of a major article on the psychology of the unconscious which emphasized the role of symbolism Jung, Freud felt personally betrayed by Jung's departure from his theoretical views.

Jung likewise felt betrayed, believing that Freud, because of his inflexibility, had failed to support this extension of their mutual work. In the years from towhen Jung was largely ostracized by the psychoanalytic community, he embarked upon a deep, extensive, and potentially dangerous process of self-analysis that he called a "confrontation with the unconscious" Jung,chap.

Jung emerged from this personal journey with the structures in place for his theories on archetypes, complexes, the collective unconscious, and the individuation process.

These theories, along with his understanding of the symbolism found in dreams and in other creative processes, formed the basis of his clinical approach, which he called analytical psychology. Throughout his long life, Jung continued to develop and broaden his theoretical framework, drawing both on his clinical practice and his study of such wide-ranging subjects as alchemy, Eastern religions, astrology, mythology, and fairy tales.

Jungian Theory Jungian theory is very much experience driven.

Individuation – A Definition

It is an approach which keeps one foot in the world of outer events and the other on the inner realm of fantasies, dreams, and symbols. Jung himself largely moved from human observation to theory. He constructed his concepts on the evidence derived from his clinical observations and personal experience, including an extended period of deep and intense self-analysis see Jung, Jung drew upon an enormous variety of mythical and anthropological material to amplify and illuminate rather than to prove his theory.

Samuels notes that awareness of this sequence is of great help in understanding Jung's often extremely dense writings: Only then could the mass of imagery and data from many sources be organised.

The organisation itself then helps to understand one aspect or other of human behavior. Thus the process is circular: Although some of Jung's structural terms were drawn from the Freudian psychoanalytic lexicon of the day, they are not necessarily used in the same way.

This is, of course, also true for the various neo-Freudian usages of this terminology. In the Freudian conceptualization, ego refers to a psychic structure which mediates between society superego and instinctual drives id.

Jung's usage is in contrast to this.

Analytical Psychology - IAAP

For Jung the ego can be understood in a much more dynamic, relative, and fragile way as a complex, a feeling-toned group of representations of oneself that has both conscious and unconscious aspects and is at the same time personal and collective. Simply put, too simply perhaps, the ego is how one sees oneself, along with the conscious and unconscious feelings that accompany that view Hopcke,p.

The ego, as one complex see below among many, is not seen by Jungians as the goal of psychological development. The Self can be understood as the central organizing principle of the psyche, that fundamental and essential aspect of human personality which gives cohesion, meaning, direction, and purpose to the whole psyche.

Resting for the most part close to the surface of the unconscious are those personal attributes and elements of experience which have been excluded from the ego, usually because of parental and societal disapproval.

These elements are known as the shadow, and they tend to be projected on less favored individuals and groups.

While in general these qualities are negative ones, the shadow may also contain positive aspects which the individual has been unable to own.Jungian analytical psychology sees the self as many things including psychic structure, developmental process, transcendental postulate, affective experience and archetype.

It has been depicted as the totality of body and mind, the God image, the experience of overpowering feelings, the union of opposites and a dynamic force which pilots the.

Analytical Psychology is the name given to the psychological-therapeutic system founded and developed by the Swiss psychiatrist Carl Gustav Jung (). Carl Jung was the son of a pastor in the Swiss Reformed Church, and many of his relatives were ministers too. The anima and animus are described in Carl Jung's school of analytical psychology as part of his theory of the collective unconscious.

Jung described the animus as the unconscious masculine side of a woman, and the anima as the unconscious feminine side of a man, with each transcending the personal psyche.

Jungian analytical psychology and the process

Jungian therapy, sometimes known as Jungian analysis, is an in-depth, analytical form of talk therapy designed to bring together the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind to help a person.

In the years from to , when Jung was largely ostracized by the psychoanalytic community, he embarked upon a deep, extensive, (and potentially dangerous) process of self-analysis that he called a "confrontation with the unconscious" (Jung, , chap. 6, pp. ). Jungian therapy, sometimes known as Jungian analysis, is an in-depth, analytical form of talk therapy designed to bring together the conscious and unconscious parts of the mind to help a person.

Analytical Psychology - IAAP